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Homebrew Recipes

Extract Brewing Methodology

There are various ways of achieving good consistent results, here is one:

First, collect your supplies. Ingredients:

Malt Extract, steeping grains, hops, any other ingredients that your recipe might call for, and a package of yeast.

Equipment:

Your basic equipment can be purchased as a starter kit and will include a plastic 25L primary fermenter, a 23L glass carboy, a syphon tube, sediment trap and clip, a big spoon, an airlock and bung and a hydrometer and trial jar.

You will also need a large pot to use as a brew kettle (this should be at least 10L but no more than 19L if you are using an electric stove), a metal strainer or colander, a medium pot for steeping your grains, and a thermometer.

Now you’re ready to start brewing!

1) Start the boil.
  • Fill your brew kettle about half full with water and turn up the heat.
  • It takes a while to start boiling.
  • Meanwhile, if you’re using liquid malt extract, place the unopened container in some hot water. This will soften the extract and make it easier to pour.
2) Steep your grains.
  • Bring a separate pot of water to a temperature of 70°C.
  • The amount of water will depend on how much steeping grain you’re using.
  • You need a litre of water for every 250g of grain.
  • Put your grains into a muslin bag and place that into the pot.
  • Cover and hold at 70°C for about 30 minutes.
  • You now have a grain tea, which can be added to the brew kettle.
  • The grains can be disposed of; it’s only the tea that you want.
3) Add malt extract.
  • Once your brew kettle starts boiling, remove from the heat and add malt extract, stirring well to keep it from scorching on the bottom.
  • You now have a liquid that can be called ‘wort’.
  • Bring the wort back to a boil (keep the lid off) and watch carefully so as to avoid a boil-over.
  • That is messy and unpleasant scenario.
  • Once it’s boiling watch it for a few minutes to ensure it’s stable.
4) Add your hops.
  • The first hop addition is for bittering purposes.
  • The longer you boil the hops the more bitterness you extract from them.
5) Follow your recipe
  • For instructions on when and if to add hops for flavour (late in the boil) and aroma (at the end of the boil) as well as any other adjuncts like herbs, spices, Irish moss etc.
  • The wort will boil for at least 60 minutes.
6) Start sterilising.
  • Sterilisation is VERY important and it can be mean the difference between 23 litres of great beer and 23 litres down the drain.
  • Follow your steriliser’s direction and sterilise the primary fermenter and lid, the airlock and bung and your strainer.
  • If you are using a wire mesh strainer, it can be sterilised by placing into the boiling wort for the final 10 minutes of the boil.
7) Chill your wort.
  • With the lid on, place your brew kettle into a sink full of cold water.
  • Block the drain with a rag so that the water drains slowly and let cold water continue to run from the tap.
  • The key here is to chill your wort as quickly as possible.
  • Add ice to the water and on top of the lid.
  • You want your wort to get down to 25°C but keep in mind you will be topping up your primary fermenter with 8- 13L of cold water which will help bring the temperature down.
8) Strain your wort
  • - into your sterilised primary fermenter.
  • Make sure your strainer is sterilised too.
  • Then you can top up your fermenter to 23 litres with cold water.
9) Measure the original gravity
  • - of your wort using the hydrometer and trial jar.
  • Note down the reading as it will be necessary in determining the ABV of your final product.
10) Pitch your yeast according to the directions on the package.
  • For Wyeast, you have to smack the package to activate it and then let it incubate at room temperature for at least three hours first, so read your labels carefully.
  • Then simply pour your yeast in, tighten the lid and attach your airlock.
  • The airlock should be half full with water.
  • It will begin bubbling, indicating the rate of fermentation.
11) Fermentation (primary).
  • Keep an eye on the fermentation.
  • It should be bubbling quite fast within the first 12 hours.
  • After about 3-4 days, the fermentation will have slowed.
  • After a week in the primary fermenter, you can syphon your beer into a secondary fermenter.
12) Fermentation (secondary).
  • Sterilise your secondary fermenter (23L glass carboy), syphon tubing and sediment trap.
  • Do this by syphoning your steriliser through the hose, into the carboy.
  • What you’re syphoning from should always be higher than what you’re syphoning into.
  • Suck the liquid through the hose until a flow is obtained.
  • If this is unappealing use an auto-syphon.
  • Now syphon the beer from the primary fermenter and avoid aeration by running the hose to the bottom of the carboy.
  • Aeration would make the beer taste stale long before it otherwise would.
  • You will notice after syphoning that a mess of yeast has flocculated (dropped to the bottom and formed a sludge).
  • You should be happy that your beer has been removed from that since autolysing yeast can produce some nasty flavours.
  • Let your beer sit in the carboy for about 2 weeks before bottling.
13) Measure the final gravity.
  • Make sure the beer has finished fermenting before bottling.
  • Using your hydrometer and trial jar, measure the specific gravity of the beer, which should be at about 1.010 depending on the recipe and style of beer.
14) Bottle your beer.
  • This involves a lot of sterilising.
  • Anything that is going to come into contact with your beer must be sterilised.
  • Without proper sterilisation your beer could be exposed to micro-organisms which will create all kinds of unpleasant odours and flavours.
  • Before you bottle your beer and after sterilising everything you will want to syphon your beer from the carboy back into the primary fermenter ‘quietly’, avoiding aeration.
  • As much as possible try to leave the sediment behind.
  • Then, gently stir in some bottling sugar (1 cup of dextrose dissolved in 1 cup of boiling water) and you’re ready to syphon into you bottles (try it using a bottle filling stick).
  • The dextrose gives the yeast that little bit of extra food needed to naturally and effectively carbonate your beer.
  • Once you’ve bottled your beer, let it sit at room temperature.
  • After 2 weeks the CO2 should be dissolved into your beer, which means it is ready to drink!
  • Your beer will improve with age up to a certain point.
  • The shelf life depends on a number of things including alcohol content, amount of hops used and how diligent you were when sterilising.
  • 3-6 months is common but much longer is possible with high ABV beers.

CONGRATUALTIONS!! YOU’VE JUST FINSHED A BATCH OF BEER! IT WILL ONLY GET BETTER AND EASIER FROM HERE! REMEMBER, IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, DON’T HESITATE TO CONTACT US at sales@hopshopuk.com or 01752 660 382.

Golden Sweet Wine (Christmas Pudding Wine)

1 Gallon / 4.5L (6 Bottles)

  • 1lb Christmas Pudding
  • 8 Oranges
  • 1 Tin of Fruit (Any will do)
  • 1 Pint of White Grape Concentrate (570ml approximately)
  • 3lb of Sugar (1.36kg approximately)
  • Sweet Wine Yeast (Gervin No.6 for example)
  • Pectolase
  1. Cut pudding into thin slices, place in bucket, pour in 5 pints (2.84L) of boiled water, whilst still hot, then stir.
  2. Add juice and zest of oranges, tinned fruit and the grape concentrate.
  3. Top up to 4.5L or 1 Gallon with cold water.
  4. Stir and adjust S.G to 1.090 with the addition of sugar,
  5. Add Pectolase, yeast etc. Stir well and place in warm room to start fermentation.
  6. Ferment in bucket for four to five days, stirring twice daily.
  7. Strain into another bucket and check SG which should have dropped considerably, add a little more sugar for the next stage of fermentation.
  8. Continue fermentation under an air lock with sugar added every few days until desired gravity is reached, or until the yeast tolerance is reached (approximately 15% ABV).
  9. Syphon off and leave to mature and clear.

A real winner of a recipe.


Provided by HOP SHOP, courtesy of Malcolm Curbishley (valued customer)
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Dandelion Wine

A medium sweet, social wine.

  • 2 litres of Dandelion heads
  • 500g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 900g of Sugar
  • 3.4 litres of Hot water
  • 3 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Campden tablets
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  • Potassium sorbate
  1. Clean the dandelions thoroughly. Remove all the green from the flower heads and use only the petals.
  2. Place these in a suitable vessel, pour hot water over them and rub them against the side of the vessel with the back of a wooden spoon to extract the essence. Cover and leave to cool.
  3. Add the citric acid and one crushed campden tablet and steep the petals twice each day for three days, keeping the vessel covered at other times.
  4. Strain out, press dry and discard the petals, stir in the concentrated grape juice, sugar, tannin, nutrient and yeast. Pour the must into a fermentation jar, fit an airlock and ferment down to S.G. 1.006.
  5. Rack into a clean jar, add 1g potassium sorbate and one campden tablet, bung tight and as soon as the wine is clear, rack again and store for three months.
  6. Syphon into bottles, cork, label and store for a further three to six months. Serve cold as a medium sweet social wine


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Rose Petal Wine

A medium sweet social wine.

  • 2 litres of Scented rose petals
  • 500g of Concentrated rose grape juice
  • 600g of Sugar
  • 3.4 litres of Hot water
  • 1 tsp of Citric acid
  • Campden tablets
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV2 Yeast
  1. Pick the roses when fully blown and just before petal fall. Place them in a suitable measure and shake them down- but do not press them.
  2. Empty the petals into a ceramic bowl or small polythene bin, pour hot water over them and rub them against the side of the vessel with the back of a wooden spoon to extract the essence. Cover and leave to cool.
  3. Add one crushed campden tablet and the citric acid, steep the petals twice a day for two days. Strain out, press dry and discard the petals. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, sugar, nutrient and yeast. Pour the must into a fermentation jar and ferment out.
  4. Rack into a clean jar, add one campden tablet, top up, bung tight and store the wine until bright.
  5. Syphon into bottles, add two saccharin pellets to each and store until the wine is six months old. Serve it cold as a delightfully fragrant social wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Beetroot Wine

A strong, sweet dessert wine.

  • 2Kg of Fresh beetroot
  • 500g of Concentrated red grape juice
  • 1.25Kg of Brown sugar
  • 3.5 litres of Water
  • 4 tsp of Citric acid
  • 1 tsp of Tannin
  • 15g of Whole ginger
  • 12 Cloves
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV4 Yeast
  1. Select tender, freshly dug beetroots, and scrub them carefully to remove every trace of soil. Top and tail them, cut into small cubes, place them in a pan together with the well bruised ginger, the cloves and as much of the water as you can. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer until the beetroot is quite tender, but not mushy, then leave to cool.
  2. Strain out, drain well and discard the beetroot and spice. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, citric acid, tannin, nutrient and an activated yeast. Pour the must into a jar, leaving room for the sugar. Fit an airlock and ferment for seven days in a warm place, 24°C.
  3. Remove half the must, stir in one third of the sugar and when it is completely dissolved, return the must to the jar. Replace the airlock and continue the fermentation.
  4. After a further seven days, repeat the process with half the remaining sugar and seven days later add the remaining portion.
  5. When fermentation is finished, move the wine to a cold place for a few days to help it to clear, then rack it into a clean jar, top up, if possible with vodka (but not too much), if not with another red wine or cold boiled water.
  6. Store this strong, sweet, dessert wine for at least one year and preferably two before bottling.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Carrot Wine- 1

A sweet wine, made with fresh carrots.

  • 2Kg of Carrots
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 1.13Kg of Sugar
  • 3.7 litres of Water
  • 4 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Campden tablet
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  • Potassium sorbate
  1. Select good quality, mid-season carrots, scrub them clean, top and tail them and chop into small, dice-sized pieces. Boil them in a covered pan until they are quite tender, and then leave them to cool.
  2. Strain them into a suitable container, discard the carrots and use only the liquor to make the wine. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, half the sugar, citric acid, tannin, nutrient and an active yeast.
  3. Pour the must into a jar, leaving room for the rest of the sugar, fit an airlock and ferment for ten days.
  4. Remove half the must, stir in half the remaining sugar, return it to the jar, replace the airlock and continue fermentation for another five days.
  5. Repeat this process with the remaining sugar, top up, and after five days start checking the specific gravity.
  6. As soon as 1.010 is reached, rack the wine into a clean jar containing 1g of potassium sorbate and one campden tablet. Top up, bung tight and store in a cold place until the wine is bright, then rack again.
  7. Mature this wine for one year then bottle and serve cold as a social wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Carrot Wine- 2

A dry white made with carrot juice.

  • 560ml of Carrot juice
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 1Kg of Sugar
  • 3.1 litres of Water
  • 4 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Campden tablets
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  1. Carrot juice is available from ‘health food’ shops and similar outlets. Empty it into a sterilised fermentation jar, add the water, citric acid, tannin and concentrated grape juice and stir well or shake the jar so that the ingredients are thoroughly mixed.
  2. Add an active yeast and nutrient, fit an airlock and ferment for three days.
  3. Remove some of the must, stir in half of the sugar, return it to the jar, refit the airlock and continue fermentation for eight days.
  4. Repeat this process with the rest of the sugar and ferment to dryness.
  5. Move the jar to a cold place for a few days, then syphon the clearing wine into a sterilised jar. Top up with white wine or cold boiled water, add one campden tablet, bung tight, label and store until the wine is bright.
  6. Rack again and mature this wine until it is one year old. Serve it cool as a white table wine with salads and vegetarian dishes.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Parsnip Wine

  • 2Kg of Fresh parsnips
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 900g of Sugar
  • 3.1 litres of Water
  • 1tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV10 Yeast
  1. Select tender, freshly dug parsnips, and scrub them carefully to remove every trace of soil. Top and tail them, cut into small cubes, place them in a pan together with as much of the water as you can. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer until the parsnips are quite tender but not mushy. Leave to cool.
  2. Strain out, drain well and discard the parsnips. Stir the concentrated grape juice into the liquor together with the citric acid, tannin, nutrient and an active yeast. Pour the must into a jar leaving room for the sugar. Fit an airlock and ferment for seven days in a warm place, 24°C.
  3. Remove half the must, stir in one third of the sugar and when it is completely dissolved, return the must to the jar, replace the airlock and continue with fermentation.
  4. After a further seven days, repeat the process with half the remaining sugar and, seven days later still, add the remaining portion in the same way.
  5. When fermentation is finished, move the wine to a cold place for a few days to help it to clear, than rack it into a clean jar, top up, if possible with vodka, if not with another white wine or cold boiled water.
  6. Store this strong, sweet, dessert wine for at least one year in a warm place and preferably after bottling, keep it for a further year.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Peapod Wine

A dry white table wine.

  • 2Kg of Empty pea pods, fresh, green and tender
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 900g of Sugar
  • 3.7 litres of Water
  • 3tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Campden tablets
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  1. Select good quality freshly picked peapods after they have been shelled. Chop them into small pieces and boil them in a covered pan until they are quite tender, then leave them to cool.
  2. Strain into a suitable container, discard the peapods and use only the liquor to make the wine. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, sugar, citric acid, tannin, nutrient and an active yeast.
  3. Pour the must into a jar, topping up if necessary, fit an airlock and ferment out.
  4. Rack the clearing wine into a clean jar, add one campden tablet, top up, bung tight and store in a cold place until the wine is bright, then rack again.
  5. Mature this wine for one year, then bottle and serve it cold as a white table wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Broad Bean Wine

A dry white table wine.

  • 2kg of Shelled broad beans at end of season
  • 2 Bananas
  • 259g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 800g of Sugar
  • 4 liters of Water
  • 3 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Nutrient
  • Campden tablets
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  1. Wash and chop up the broad beans and place them in a pan for boiling. Peel and thinly slice the bananas and add to the pan. Pour on the water, bring to the boil, cover and simmer until the beans are soft, then leave to cool.
  2. Strain out, drain and discard the solids. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, sugar, citric acid, tannin, nutrient and an active yeast. Pour the must into a jar, top up if necessary, fit an airlock and ferment out to dryness.
  3. Rack into a clean jar, top up, add one campden tablet, bung tight and store until the wine is bright.
  4. Rack again and store for one year before bottling. Serve cold as a dry white table wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Folly or Faux Wine

A dry white table wine.

  • 2.5kg of Young vine shoots, leave and prunings
  • 2 Bananas
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 800g of Sugar
  • 4 litres of Water
  • 3 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  1. Wash the shoots, chop them up and place them in a pan for boiling. Peel and thinly slice the bananas and add them to the pan. Pour on the water, bring to the boil, cover and simmer for thirty minutes then leave to cool.
  2. Strain out, drain and discard the solids. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, sugar, citric acid, tannin, nutrient and an active yeast. Pour the must into a jar, top up if necessary, fit an airlock and ferment out to dryness.
  3. Rack into a clean jar, top up, add one campden tablet, bung tight and store until the wine is bright.
  4. Rack again and store for one year before bottling. Serve cold as a dry white table wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Bramble Wine- 1

A dry rose made with bramble jelly.

  • 450g of Bramble jelly
  • 1 litre of Apple juice
  • 250g of Concentrated rose grape juice
  • 680g of Suger
  • 2.8 litres of Water
  • 1 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Pectic enzyme (Pectolase)
  • Campden tablets
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV2 Yeast
  1. Dissolve the bramble jelly in warm water and when cool add the apple juice, concentrated grape juice, citric acid, pectic enzyme and one crushed campden tablet. Cover and leave for twenty-four hours.
  2. Stir in the tannin, nutrient, and active yeast, and then pour the must into a fermentation jar. Leave space for the sugar, fit an airlock and ferment for ten days.
  3. Remove some of the must, stir in the sugar and return it to the jar. Refit the airlock and continue fermentation to dryness.
  4. Rack the wine into a clean jar, add one campden tablet, and top up. Bung tight, label and store until the wine is bright.
  5. Rack again and when the wine is six months old, syphon it into clean bottles each containing one saccharin pellet. Cork, label and keep for one month then serve cold with picnic meals.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Bramble Wine- 2

A dry white made with bramble tips

  • 2.5kg of lackberry shoots
  • 2 Bananas
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 800g of Sugar
  • 4 litres of Water
  • 14g of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  1. Wash the shoots, chop them up and place them in a pan for boiling. Peel and thinly slice the bananas and add to the pan. Pour on the water, bring to the boil, cover and simmer for thirty minutes, then leave to cool.
  2. Strain out, drain and discard the solids. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, sugar, citric acid, tannin, nutrient, and an active yeast. Pout the must into a fermentation jar, top up if necessary, fit an airlock and ferment out to dryness.
  3. Rack the wine into a clean jar, top up, add one campden tablet, bung tight, label and store until it is bright.
  4. Rack again and store for one year before bottling. Serve col as a dry white table wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Apple Wine

20 June 2009

Apple Wine

  • 6 lb mixed apples
  • 1 lb sultanas
  • 1 1/2 lb sugar
  • 1 teaspoon nutrient
  • 1 vitamin B1 tablet
  • 2 teaspoons pectolase
  • Hock type yeast
  • Campden tablets
  • Water to 1 gallon
  1. Dissolve 1 crushed campden tablet in 4 pints of cold water in a sterilised fermenting bucket.
  2. Chop or slice the apples thinly and put them quickly into the sulphited water. Add the washed, minced sultanas, the pectolase, yeast nutrient and vitamin B1 tablet.
  3. Stir, place an upturned plate on top of the fruit and cover the bucket. Leave for 24 hours.
  4. Make sure the yeast starter is fully active before pouring it carefully into one side of the bucket. If the yeast starter is kept to a small area of the bucket an active yeast colony will quickly become established, and can then be stirred into the bulk must. When it is fully active a fruit cap will form on top of the must; this should be kept submerged with a plate to enable a quicker and better extraction rate and to exclude as much oxygen as possible. The cap should be broken up 2 or 3 times daily depending on the activity of the fermentation.
  5. Ferment on the pulp for 4 days.
  6. Strain off the liquid, pressing the pulp lightly and pour into the sterilised demijohn adding the dissolved sugar. ( The demijohn should not be more than 7/8ths full to minimise waste from excess frothing. )
  7. Fit an airlock and stand the demijohn in a warm place. Top the jar up after a few days with any surplus must or a little cold water.
  8. When the fermentation ceases ( usually 2-3 weeks ) syphon the clearing wine from the sediment into a clean demijohn and move to a cool place.
  9. After 1 or 2 days rack again, adding 2 campden tablets and topping up with a little cold water.
  10. After 2 weeks rack again, adding 1 more campden tablet.
  11. Replace the airlock with a cork bung. Rack again when a heavy deposit forms. If care is taken there should not be any need to add further sulphite for dry table wines but if in doubt another campden tablet may be added. NOTE If you like there to be a little residual sugar in the wine, you should rack it when the S.G. drops to 1.000. Remove to a cool place or refrigerate for 24 hours before racking and adding the campden tablet. To safeguard this medium dry wine an extra campden tablet should be added during the maturing period.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Blackberry Wine (Dry)

22 May 2009
  • 3 lb freshly picked blackberries
  • 1/2 pint red grape juice concentrate
  • 1 kg bag sugar
  • 1 teaspoon nutrient
  • 1 teaspoon pectolase
  • Burgundy yeast
  • Campden tablet
  • Finings
  • Water
  1. Wash, drain and crush the blackberries.
  2. Place in a sterilized white plastic bucket and pour on 5 pints of boiling water.
  3. When cool add the pectolase, red grape juice concentrate, nutrient and yeast.
  4. Cover loosely with the lid and ferment for 3 days. Strain the juice into a demijohn.
  5. Dissolve the sugar in 1 pint of boiling water, allow to cool and add to the demijohn.
  6. Fit an airlock and continue to ferment, topping up with water to one gallon when the frothing dies down.
  7. When fermentation stops and specific gravity reaches 1.000 or less syphon the wine off the sediment into another sterilised demijohn with 1 crushed campden tablet.
  8. Add finings and when the wine is crystal clear it can be syphoned into bottles and corked.
  9. Should be ready for drinking at Christmas.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Blackberry Wine (Sweet)

22 May 2009
  • 4 lb freshly picked blackberries
  • 1/2 pint red grape juice concentrate
  • 2 3/4 lb sugar
  • 1 teaspoon nutrient
  • 1 teaspoon pectolase
  • 1 teaspoon citric acid
  • 1/4 teaspoon tannin
  • Port yeast
  • Campden tablet
  • Finings
  • Water
  1. Wash, drain and crush the blackberries.
  2. Place in a sterilized white plastic bucket and pour on 5 pints of boiling water.
  3. When cool add the pectolase, red grape juice concentrate, nutrient, tannin, acid and yeast.
  4. Cover loosely with the lid and ferment for 3 days. Strain the juice into a demijohn.
  5. Dissolve 1 3/4 lb of sugar in 1 pint of boiling water, allow to cool and add to the demijohn.
  6. Fit an airlock and continue to ferment, adding the remaining 1 lb of sugar as a syrup in two 8 oz doses at weekly intervals.
  7. Rack at SG 1020, and add 1 crushed camden tablet Rack again when fermentation stops and the specific gravity reaches 1.0108. Add finings and when the wine is crystal clear it can be syphoned into bottles and corked.
  8. Due to the higher body and alcohol level in this wine it will benefit by leaving to mature for 18 months if you can. (Not all of us can do this)


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Cider

Wed, 24th Jun 2009

Making cider at home is a very rewarding way of using apples, which might otherwise go to waste, to produce a refreshing and wholesome drink. Cider is fermented pure apple juice and can be made from almost any variety of apple. Cider apples produce a deep coloured slightly bitter cider whilst a paler cider is produced from dessert and cooking varieties. Most home cider makers make use of the apples they have to hand. Choose ripe fruit, avoiding unripe early windfalls or those apples which may have been shed early due to drought. Ripeness is important because ripe fruit will contain the highest sugar levels and it is the sugar level which will determine the potential alcohol level of the finished cider. Bruised and slightly browned apples are acceptable but avoid rotten fruit.

Apples must be crushed before pressing; the degree of pressing will determine the yield of fruit from the press. One method is to place the apples in a strong tub and to pound them with a length of heavy timber, 4” x 4” is ideal. Alternatively, purpose built apple crushers are available to hire or buy, which reduce the fruit to a suitable consistency for pressing without the brute force of pounding.

Once pulped the juice can be pressed. For small scale pressing, basket presses are used, which consist of a cylinder into which the pulp is poured and a piston which is driven into the cylinder by means of a screw. The juice escapes through gaps in the cylinder and is collected in a channel in the base of the press.

Once pressed the juice should be poured into food grade containers. Check the Specific Gravity. This is likely to be between 1040, which will give about 5% alcohol, and 1065 which gives about 8.5 % alcohol. If the gravity is below 1040, or a stronger cider is preferred, then sugar can be added to raise the gravity.

In the traditional process nothing is added to the juice, the naturally occurring yeasts are left to bring about the fermentation of the juice, converting the apple sugars to alcohol. Modern cider makers add at least two extras, sulphur dioxide in the form of campden tablets, and then a cultured wine yeast. The sulphur dioxide subdues some wild yeasts and bacteria and thus reduces the risk of spoilage of the cider. Add two crushed campden tablets per gallon, and after 24 hours add a sachet of Gervin No 3 yeast per container of juice holding up to 5 gallons.

Keep the fermenting cider at a steady temperature of about 15 C. The initial fermentation is usually quick and violent. Make sure that any overflow will not cause a problem. As soon as possible fit an airlock to the container and from now on try and avoid air contact with the cider, keeping all containers topped up.The fermentation should take from 10 days to 10 weeks. When the gravity drops to 1005 or below the cider should be racked carefully into another container leaving behind the sediment and solids. Ensure that the newly filled container is topped up to exclude air and that an airlock is fitted. Store the containers in a cool place and if more sediment forms over the next few months then repeat the racking process.

The finished cider should be treated with one campden tablet per gallon, stored in bulk and when ready for drinking racked into smaller containers such as bottles.

So choose reasonably sound apples. Crush and press the fruit to produce the juice. To each gallon of juice add 2 campden tablets. After 24 hours add one sachet of Gervin No 3 yeast to each container of up to 5 gallons. Place the container in a warm place and fit an airlock as soon as possible. Fermentation can take from 10 days to 10 weeks.When finished syphon the cider into a clean container and top up to exclude all air. Put the container in a cool place to speed up the clearing process. Your cider should be ready for drinking by early summer. Some ciders clear, others remain slightly cloudy. This does not impair the drinking quality. If you would like a sweet cider mix up a little sugar and water to make a syrup- add this to the cider prior to drinking. Do not add sugar to the cider before bottling, this may cause an explosion due to fermentation in the bottle.

This recipe is abbreviated, with the authors permission, from the booklet ‘Basic Cider & Juice Making’ written by Alex Hill of Vigo Ltd.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Red Dessert Wines

Wed, 24th Jun 2009

    Recipe 1

    • 2 lb Elderberries
    • 4 lb Blackberries
    • ½ lb Raspberries
    • 1 litre Red Grape Juice
    • 1 ½ lb Granulated Sugar
  • Recipe 2

    • 2 ½ lb Elderberries
    • 2 ½ lb Blackberries
    • ½ lb Black Currants
    • 1 ½ lb Bananas
    • 2 lb Granulated Sugar
  • Recipe 3

    • 3 off 2 lb Jars Bilberries
    • 1 lb Dried Apricots
    • 1 lb Raisins
    • 1 litre Red Grape Juice
    • 1 lb Granulated Sugar

All recipes to 1 gallon, use Gervin No 3 yeast, nutrients and pectic enzyme. Use sugar for sweetening to a final gravity of between 1030 and 1040. All desert wines should be matured for 1 year preferably in oak casks.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

White Dessert Wines

Wed, 24th Jun 2009

    Recipe 1

    • 2 litres Apple Juice
    • 2 lb Bananas
    • 1 litre White Grape Juice
    • 1 ½ lb Granulated Sugar
  • Recipe 2

    • 1 litre Apple Juice
    • 1 litre Pineapple Juice
    • ¾ lb Dried Apricots
    • 2 lb Granulated Sugar
  • Recipe 3

    • 2 litres White Grape Juice
    • 28 oz Tinned Peaches
    • 1 lb Sultanas
    • 1 lb Bananas
    • 1 lb Granulated Sugar

All recipes to 1 gallon, use Gervin No 3 yeast, nutrients and pectic enzyme. Use sugar for sweetening to a final gravity of between 1030 and 1040. All desert wines should be matured for 1 year preferably in oak casks.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Elderberry Wine

Fri, 1st Jan 2010
  • 2 lb elderberries
  • 1 lb sloes, bullaces or blackcurrants
  • 1/2 lb dried currants
  • 1 lb sultanas
  • 1 1/2 lb sugar
  • 1 teaspoon nutrient
  • 1 vitamin B1 tablet
  • 1 teaspoons pectolase
  • Burgundy or bordeaux type yeast
  • Campden tablets
  • Water to 1 gallon

Strip the elderberries from the stems and wash them, removing any green ones that float to the surface. Crush the berries with the sloes, add the washed, minced dried currants and sultanas and place in a plastic bucket with 5 pints of cold water, 1 crushed campden tablet, the pectolase, yeast nutrient and vitamin B1 tablet. Stir well and leave for 24 hours before adding an active yeast starter. Ferment on the pulp for 3 days, keeping the fruit submerged with a plate and the bucket covered. Strain and pour into a demijohn with the dissolved sugar.( The demijohn should not be more than 7/8ths full to minimise waste from excess frothing. ) Fit an airlock and stand the demijohn in a warm place. Top the jar up after a few days with any surplus must or a little cold water. When the fermentation ceases ( usually 2-3 weeks ) syphon the clearing wine from the sediment into a clean demijohn and move to a cool place. After 1 or 2 days rack again, adding 2 campden tablets and topping up with a little cold water. After 2 weeks rack again, adding 1 more campden tablet. Replace the airlock with a cork bung. Rack again when a heavy deposit forms. If care is taken there should not be any need to add further sulphite for dry table wines but if in doubt another campden tablet may be added.

NOTE If you like there to be a little residual sugar in the wine, you should rack it when the S.G. drops to 1.000. Remove to a cool place or refrigerate for 24 hours before racking and adding the campden tablet. To safeguard this medium dry wine an extra campden tablet should be added during the maturing period.

Mature in bulk for 18 months.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Elderflower Wine

  • 3 large heads of elderflower florets
  • 250g white grape concentrate
  • 1kg white sugar
  • 5g citric acid
  • 5g grape tann
  • Gervin No 3 Champagne yeast
  • 1 level teaspoon yeast nutrient
  • 1 vitamin B1 tablet
  • Campden tablets
  • Water to 1 gallon

Check before you pick the flowers that they are a variety suitable for winemaking, as some have a very unpleasant smell! They should be light and fragrantly scented, not ‘catty’. Pinch a floret between your fingers and check the nose; this is the nose that the finished wine will have. Always pick when the sun is out, and the flowers are dry and fully open.

Strip the florets from the stalks and place them in a bucket. Add 4 pints (2.25 litres) of boiling water and leave covered for two days, stirring at least twice daily.

On the third day, dissolve the sugar in 2 pints of warm water and pour into a sterilised demijohn. Then strain off the flowers adding the liquid to the demijohn along with the white grape concentrate, tannin, citric acid, nutrient and B1 tablet. Top up the demijohn to the shoulder with cold water, and add the yeast. Fit an airlock and bung and leave the wine at the correct temperature, 19-21°C, until the fermentation is complete.

Syphon the wine off the sediment into a clean demijohn, top up to the shoulder with cool water if necessary, add a campden tablet and leave to mature in a cool place. Rack at three-month intervals and add a further campden tablet if the wine has thrown a deposit.

This wine is drinkable in 9 months, but is better left for a year.

Do not be tempted to use a greater quantity of elderflowers in this recipe. Elderflowers are very easy to collect, but if you use too many you may find that the strong bouquet spoils the wine.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Gooseberry and Apricot

Wed, 24th Jun 2009
  • 680g tin of gooseberries in syrup
  • 225g tinned or fresh apricots or 112g dried
  • 450g bananas
  • 245g white grape concentrate
  • 3g citric acid
  • 5g Yeast nutrient
  • Gervin No 5 yeast
  • 5g pectic enzyme
  • 1kg sugar

Place the gooseberries and syrup in the fermenting bucket, macerating them as you do so. Stone the apricots if fresh, and crush them, together with the gooseberries. Peel the bananas, cut them into small pieces, and simmer with 1 litre of water in a saucepan for 20 minutes, then tip the pan’s contents into the bucket. Stir in the sugar until dissolved. When cool, 20 - 21oC add the rest of the ingredients, 1.5 litres of cold water and the yeast. Cover closely and leave in a warm spot, stirring daily. After 7 days, strain through a nylon sieve over a funnel into a demijohn, topping up to the shoulder of the jar by ‘rinsing’ the pulp with lukewarm water. Fit an airlock and leave it to ferment to completion in the normal way. Rack from the lees when the fermentation has ended, add a crushed campden tablet and leave the wine to clear, fining if necessary.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Gooseberry Wine (dry)

Sat, 20th Jun 2009
  • Juice from 1kilo of Gooseberries
  • 500ml White Grape Juice (without preservative) in a carton or 250ml White Grape Concentrate
  • 750g White Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon nutrient
  • 1 teaspoon pectolase
  • Gervin D yeast
  • Campden tablet
  • Finings
  • Water to 1 gallon

For best results use fully ripe Gooseberries. It is recommended to extract the juice. To do this easily just wash the fruit and put in the freezer. In this case there is no need to top and tail them.

When you are ready to make the wine remove the fruit from the freezer, put it in a suitable container and pour 1 1/2 pints of boiling water over. When the mixture has reached room temperature squeeze the fruit under the water with your hands and burst each berry.

Add the pectolase, cover the mixture, and leave for a couple of hours for the enzyme to work.

Press out the juice using a fruit press, if available, or a nylon straining bag. The gooseberry juice, white grape juice, sugar, nutrient and yeast can all be added to the demijohn.

Ferment in the usual way under an airlock, rack, fine and rack the wine again before bottling.

You can ferment on the pulp if you want to but if you are doing this top and tail the fruit first and keep the pulp fermentation short, just a couple of days.

You can use 2kg of Gooseberries which will produce a fuller bodied medium dry wine with a higher acid level. In this case it would be important to use a yeast that will reduce the level of Malic Acid, such as Gervin D Yeast.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Grape Wine White

Wed, 24th Jun 2009
  • 15 lb white grapes
  • Sugar to adjust
  • 2 teaspoons pectic enzyme
  • White wine yeast
  • Campden tablets or strong sulphite solution

Pick the grapes, remove them from the stalks and place them in a plastic bucket.

If the grapes are fully ripe they can be crushed easily by hand or with a sterilised wooden block.

Add the pectic enzyme, and one crushed Campden tablet or 1 teaspoon strong sulphite solution.

Stir well, cover with an upturned plate, then cover the bucket and leave for 24 hours.

Press the grapes or strain through a strong nylon straining bag, squeezing the bag to extract all the juice.

Take an S.G. reading of the juice and adjust with sugar syrup to 1.080.

Pour into a glass demijohn and add an active yeast starter.

Plug the jar with cotton wool and when the fermentation is active replace with an airlock.

Leave in a warm place and when the fermentation ceases (10-14 days) rack the clearing wine from the lees into a clean jar and remove to a cool place.

After 2 days rack again, adding 2 campden tablets or 2 teaspoons strong sulphite solution.

Mature in bulk for 12 months before bottling.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Grape Wine Red

Wed, 24th Jun 2009
  • 15 lb red grapes
  • Sugar to adjust
  • 2 teaspoons pectic enzyme
  • Burgundy or Bordeaux wine yeast
  • Campden tablets or strong sulphite solution

Pick the grapes, remove them from the stalks and place them in a plastic bucket.

Crush the grapes by hand or with a sterilised wooden block.

Add the pectic enzyme and one crushed Campden tablet or 1 teaspoon strong sulphite solution.

Stir well, cover with an upturned plate, then cover the bucket and leave for 24 hours.

Strain a little juice to take the S.G. reading and adjust with sugar syrup to 1.090.

Add an active yeast starter and ferment on the pulp for 7 days, keeping the fruit submerged with the plate and the bucket tightly covered.

Break up the fruit cap two or three times daily.

Strain and pour into a glass demijohn and fit an airlock.

When the fermentation ceases rack the clearing wine from the lees into a clean jar and remove to a cool place.

After 2 days rack again, adding 2 campden tablets or 2 teaspoons strong sulphite solution, and fit a cork bung.

Rack again when a heavy deposit forms, adding another campden tablet or 1 teaspoon strong sulphite solution.

Mature in bulk for 18 months before bottling.

When growing grapes in this country we need good summer weather to enable the vine to produce grapes with a high sugar level, and a low acid content.

A wine made from unripe grapes will be of poor quality with a low alcohol level and a high acidity.

If the grapes can be left on the vine for the maximum sugar level to be achieved, birds and diseases allowing, a far superior wine should be achieved.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Mead

Sat, 20th Jun 2009
  • 1.3kg Honey
  • 20g Tartaric acid (4 teaspoons)
  • 1 teaspoon pectolase
  • Gervin 3 yeast
  • 10 gm Yeast nutrient (2 teaspoon)
  • Campden tablet
  • Finings
  • Water to 1 gallon

Whilst many wine making ingredients naturally contain levels of acids and nutrients the amount of both of these occurring in honey is negligible. It is therefore most important that an adequate supply is provided in the must. For this reason the quantities of both acid and nutrient used in this recipe are much higher than most winemakers will be used to. Trust me!

Most bought honeys will have been cleaned and filtered but if you are using your own it would be best to dissolve the honey in some water and to bring it to the boil and skim before using it.

Mix the honey with 5 pints of boiling water in a sterilised white food grade plastic bucket.

When cool add the nutrient, pectolase, tartaric acid and the yeast.

Cover loosely with the lid and ferment for 3 days. Rack the liquid into a demijohn.

Fit an airlock and continue to ferment, topping up with water to one gallon when the frothing dies down.

When fermentation stops and the specific gravity reaches 1.000 or less syphon the mead off the sediment into another sterilised demijohn and add 1 crushed campden tablet.

Add the finings and when the mead is crystal clear it can be racked off again before being syphoned into bottles and corked. MEAD medium sweet

Make the mead as above but with the addition at step 5 of 350gm of honey to sweeten, and a level teaspoon of a wine stabiliser to reduce the possibility of refermentation.

METHEGLIN

Both the dry and the medium sweet versions of this mead can be used as the basis to make a Metheglin or Meddyglin (from the Welsh meddyg”, a physician) by adding a combination of spices to taste. Traditionally anise, caraway, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, ginger, lemon grass, mace and pimento have all been used.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

Rhubarb (Dry)

Wed, 24th Jun 2009
  • 4 1/2 lb fresh rhubarb
  • 1/2 pint white grape juice concentrate
  • 1 kg sugar
  • 1 teaspoon nutrient
  • 1 teaspoon pectolase
  • Gervin D yeast
  • Campden tablet
  • Finings
  • Water to 1 gallon

Trim off both the white base of the stalk and the leaves at the top and wipe the stalks clean. Chop the rhubarb into small pieces and put them into a sterilised white food grade plastic bucket and pour on 5 pints of boiling water. When cool add the pectolase, white grape juice concentrate, nutrient and the yeast.

Cover loosely with the lid and ferment for 3 days. Strain the juice into a demijohn. Dissolve the sugar in 1 pint of boiling water, allow this to cool and add it to the demijohn. Fit an airlock and continue to ferment, topping up with water to one gallon when the frothing dies down.

When fermentation stops and the specific gravity reaches 1.000 or less syphon the wine off the sediment into another sterilised demijohn and add 1 crushed campden tablet. Add the finings and when the wine is crystal clear it can racked off again before being syphoned into bottles and corked. This wine is best made with the young fruit around May.

As this fruit is usually quite sharp no additional acid should be required. This wine makes an ideal base to produce a sparking wine, and it is also good to use for blending.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

White Wines by Competition Class

Wed, 24th Jun 2009

    Recipe 1

    • WHITE TABLE WINE DRY
    • 1 litre of Apple Juice
    • 1½ litres of White Grape Juice
    • 1 teaspoon of Tartaric Acid
    • 1 teaspoon of Pectic Enzyme
    • ¼ teaspoon of Tannin
    • ¼ teaspoon Minavit Nutrient
    • 1 Vitamin B1 Tablet
    • Sugar to 1085 S.G.
    • Gervin Number 5 Yeast
  • Recipe 2

    • WHITE TABLE WINE DRY
    • 1 by 8oz tin of Frozen Orange Juice
    • 2 by 8 oz tins of White Grape Juice Concentrate
    • 1 teaspoon of Pectic Enzyme
    • ¼ teaspoon of Minavit Nutrient
    • ¼ teaspoon of Tannin
    • 1 Vitamin B1 Tablet
    • Sugar to 1085 O.G.
    • Gervin Number 3 Yeast
    • As the specific gravity drops feed in a further 12 ounces of sugar in stages.

  • Recipe 3

    • WHITE SOCIAL WINE
    • 2 litres White Grape Juice
    • 28 oz Tinned Peaches
    • 1 lb Sultanas
    • 1 lb Bananas
    • I teaspoon of Pectic Enzyme
    • ¼ teaspoon of Minavit Nutrient
    • 1 Vitamin B1 Tablet
    • 1 lb Granulated Sugar
    • Gervin Number 3 Yeast

After about five days of pulp fermentation in a bucket the wine should be transferred into a demijohn and the initial 1lb of sugar should be added. As the specific gravity drops feed in as much extra sugar as can be fermented out. Use sugar if necessary to sweeten to a final gravity of between 1030 and 1040. This wine should preferably be matured for one year.


Provided by HOP SHOP
22 Dale Road, Mutley,
Plymouth,
PL4 6PE

www.hopshopuk.com
Tel 01752 660382

National Association of Wine & Beermakers Recipes

To view all recipes by the NAWB, please click the link below.

NAWB Recipes

Alcohol & Diabetes

Anyone suffering from diabetes should not take any alcoholic beverage without prior permission of their doctor.

The issues arising primarily revolve around two points. Firstly there is of course the residual sugar level and secondly the quantity of carbohydrates, namely calorie count.

The following guidelines might prove useful:

  1. The alcohol content should be low.
  2. The taste profile should be light and delicate and rather than strong and heavy.
  3. Extensive use of an hydrometer will enable the gravities to be monitored carefully.
  4. In the case of wine the use of Pectolase, Rohapect & Amylase will assist in reducing the residual sugar levels.
  5. In the case of beer the use of dry beer enzyme will assist in reducing the residual sugar levels.
  6. Increasing the amount of yeast used (up to 5 times the recommended) will assist in providing a sound fermentation.
  7. An original gravity of one 1030 or below should be targeted.
  8. In terms of beer styles: mild ale/lagers.
  9. Stouts, export ales, best bitters and barley wine are best avoided.

Birch Sap Wine

  • 4.5 litres of Birch Sap
  • 225g of Raisins
  • 1.2Kgs of Sugar
  • 120ml of Orange Juice
  • 1 tsp of Yeast Nutrient
  • 15g of Citric Acid
  • 1 tsp of Tannin
  • Gervin GV1 Yeast
  • Heavy Sugar Syrup (Optional)
  1. Boil together the sap, raisins and sugar for 5 minutes. Allow to cool, then add the orange juice, yeast nutrient, acid and tannin. When the temperature has fallen to 21°C add the active yeast and stir well. Cover the vessel and leave to ferment for four days.
  2. Strain the must and fill the wine into a clean demijohn. Fill to approximately ½” below the cork, fit airlock and ferment until dry.
  3. Rack and store in a cool place.
  4. If the wine is too dry, sweeten with a heavy sugar syrup.

Port Type Wine

  • 2.2kg of Blackberries, or:
       > 1.8Kg of Damsons,
       > 1.8Kg of Elderberries,
       > 1.8Kg of Bilberries,
       > 1.8Kg of loganberries
  • 4.5 litres of Water
  • 2 tsps of Pectolase
  • 1 Campden Tablet
  • 300ml of Red Grape Juice Concentrate
  • 1.4 - 1.6kg of Sugar
  • 1 tsp of Yeast Nutrient
  • Gervin GV4 Yeast
  • Heavy Sugar Syrup
  • 100ml of Brandy or Vodka
  1. Put the fruit in a fermentation vessel, crush or bruise it and pour over 2 litres of cold water. Add the pectolase and a crushed campden tablet. Cover and leave for 24 hours.
  2. Heat 1 litre of water and dissolve the grape concentrate and 500g or sugar, leave it to cool to 27°C and add to the fruit. Stir well, add the yeast nutrient and an active yeast.
  3. Ferment for three days, stirring twice daily. If stone fruit is used, remove as many stones as possible after 24 hours. Press or strain the must. Heat a further 1 litre of water and dissolve in 500g sugar, cool this to 21°C and add to the must.
  4. Stir, pour into a clean demijohn and leave to ferment. Do not be surprised if there is a slight delay in fermentation.
  5. Ferment until the final gravity becomes 1.005.
  6. Feed the wine 100ml at a time until fermentation stops. The final gravity should be between 1.015 – 1.020.
  7. When fermentation stops, rack and store in a cool place.
  8. It can be improved by the addition of 100ml or brandy or vodka.

Sherry Type Wine- 1

A dry sherry type wine.

  • 2.3 litres of Juice from sweet oranges
  • 1 tsp of Pectolase
  • 15g of Citric acid
  • 1 of Campden tablet
  • 1tsp of Yeast Nutrient
  • 450g of Sultanas
  • 1.7 litres of Water
  • 900g of Sugar
  • Gervin GV4 yeast
  1. Mix the orange juice, pectolase, acid, campden tablet and yeast nutrient in a fermentation vessel.
  2. Chop the sultanas and boil the, in 1.7litres of water for 15 minutes. Strain and discard the sultanas, measure the cooking liquour and make it up to 1.7 litres again with cold water.
  3. Dissolve the sugar in the liquor, allow it to cool to 27°C then add it to the must. Add the active yeast.
  4. Pour it into a clean demijohn with bung and airlock and ferment until dry.
  5. Rack the wine, seal and store in a cool plac

Sherry Type Wine- 2

A sweet sherry type wine.

  • 450g of Raisins,
  • 2.8 litres of Fresh apple juice
  • 1 tsp of Pectolase
  • 1 tsp of Citric acid
  • 1 of Campden tablet
  • 1.1 litres of Water
  • 1.2Kg of Sugar
  • 0.57 litres of White grape juice concentrate
  • 1 tsp of Yeast nutrient
  • Sherry yeast
  • Heavy sugar syrup
  1. Chop the raisins into small pieces and put them in a fermentation vessel. Add the apple juice, pectolase, acid and a crushed campden tablet. Cover and leave for 24 hours.
  2. Heat the water and dissolve in 1kg of sugar, the grape juice concentrate and yeast nutrient. Allow to cool to 27°C and add to the apple juice. Add the active yeast, cover and ferment for 6 days stirring twice a day. Strain the must and dissolve the remaining sugar in the juice.
  3. Pour into a clean jar and fill to within an inch of the bung. Attach airlock and bung. Ferment at 18°C until the gravity is 1.005.
  4. Feed the wine with the heavy sugar syrup.
  5. Rack into a clean demijohn and store.

Mixed Soft Fruit Wine

A medium dry rose.

  • 1.5kg of Mixed soft fruit as available
  • 250g of Concentrated rose grape juiceile
  • 900g of Sugar
  • 2.8 litres of Water
  • 1 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • Pectolase
  • Campden tablet
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV2 yeast
  1. Stalk, wash and crush the fruit, place it in a suitable bin and pour hot water over it. Cover and leave to coo
  2. Add the acid, pectolase and one crushed campden tablet, cover and leave for twenty-four hour
  3. Stir in the concentrated grape juice, tannin, nutrient and activated yeast. Ferment on the pulp for three days. Keeping the fruit submerged and the bin covere
  4. Strain out, press dry and discard the fruit, stir in the sugar, pour the must into a fermentation jar and ferment ou
  5. Rack into a clean jar, add one campden tablet, top up, bung tight and store until the wine is brigh
  6. Rack again and store for nine months, then bottle. Add on saccharin tablet to each and store for a further three months.

*Use a mixture of black, red and whitecurrants, raspberries, strawberries, loganberries, blackberries, cherries, plums and gooseberries. Do not let any one fruit dominate (170- 230g per fruit is plenty).

Mixed Vegetable Wine

A medium sweet, white social wine.

  • 2Kg of Carrots, parsnips and swedes
  • 250g of Concentrated white grape juice
  • 1.1Kg of Sugar
  • 4 tsp of Citric acid
  • ½ tsp of Tannin
  • 3.7 litres of Water
  • Campden tablet
  • Nutrient
  • Gervin GV1 yeast
  1. Top, tail, scrub clean, cut up the vegetables into small cubes, add the water and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer until all the vegetables are tender.
  2. Strain on to the sugar and acid. Stir well until both are dissolved then cover and leave to cool.
  3. Add the concentrated grape juice, tannin, nutrient and active yeast. Pour the must into a jar, fit an airlock and ferment out.
  4. Move the jar to a cold place for a few days, then rack into a clean jar, add one campden tablet, bung tight and store until the wine is bright.
  5. Rack again and mature this wine for eighteen months.

Mild

A low alcohol, slightly hopped, full bodied beer with residual sweetness.

  • 1. Maris Otter 3kg
  • 2. Crystal Medium 400gms
  • 3. Chocolate 150gms
  • 4. OG 1035
  • 5. FG 1010
  • 6. ABV 3.3%
  • 7. Mash – single infusion 67°C 90 mins
  • 8. Boil 90 mins
  • 9. Hops Fuggles 35 gms Full length
  • 10. Fuggles 10 gms Last 5 mins
  • 11. Yeast Windsor or Wyeast 1098

Pale

Straw coloured fruity refreshing beer with a residual dryness & hop character contribution.

  • 1. Maris Otter 4.5Kg
  • 2. OG 1045
  • 3. FG 1010
  • 4. ABV 4.5%
  • 5. Mash – single infusion 66°C 90 mins
  • 6. Boil 90 mins
  • 7. Hops Fuggles 30 gms Full length
  • 8. Northdown 15 gms Full length
  • 9. Irish Moss 5 gms Last 10 mins
  • 10. Hops Goldings 10 gms End of boil
  • 11. Yeast Gervin 12 or Wyeast 1056

Bitter

Yellow golden beer with balanced hoppiness & malt

  • 1. Maris Otter 4.6 Kgs
  • 2. OG 1045
  • 3. FG 1010
  • 4. ABV 4.6%
  • 5. Mash – single infusion 66°C 90 mins
  • 6. Boil 90 mins
  • 7. Hops Challenger 50 gms Full length,
    Goldings 20 gms Last 10 mins
  • 8. Irish Moss 4 gms Last 10 mins
  • 9. Hops Styrian 10 gms End of boil
  • 10. Yeast Nottingham or Wyeast 1056

Stout

Dark dry full bodied full flavoured beer with a beautiful cream head.

  • 1. Maris Otter or Spring Malted Barley 3.2 Kg
  • 2. Flaked Barley 900 gms
  • 3. Roasted Barley 450 gms
  • 4. OG 1042
  • 5. FG 1012
  • 6. ABV 4%
  • 7. Mash – single infusion 66°C
  • 8. Boil 90 mins
  • 9. Hops Target 38 gms Full length
  • 10. Yeast Safale SO-4 or Wyeast 1084

Variants : Oatmeal, Russian, Cream

Lager

Subtle, pleasing aroma, full flavour pale beer with sharp character

Pilsner - highly hopped both in flavour and aroma. This style has a thick head with good retention

Soft water for best results.

  • 1. Pilsner Malt 3.6 Kg
  • 2. Vienna Malt 450 gms
  • 3. Munich Malt 230 gms
  • 4. Carapils Malt 230 gms
  • 5. OG 1048
  • 6. FG 1014
  • 7. ABV 4.6%
  • 8. Mash – single infusion 60 mins
  • a. 55°C 15 mins
  • b. 68°C 45 mins
  • 9. Boil 90 mins
  • 10. Irish Moss 5 gms 10 mins
  • 11. Hops Cluster 40 gms 60 mins
  • Saaz 25 gms 15 mins
  • Saaz 20 gms End of boil
  • 11. Yeast Brewferm Lager Yeast or Wyeast 2272

© The Hop Shop, 2017

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